Holly on a foggy day

Nov 21, 2019

I transplanted this holly approximately 5 years ago. I just wanted to show her to you!

Did you know that holly trees are male and female? The female trees produce berries, the males don’t (that is my understanding anyway). Also, you need a male and a female in close proximity of each other to produce babies. I counted how many females I have the other day, but I can’t remember. At least 3, I think more than that!!

It’s hard to tell in this photo, but it is about 8 feet tall at this point! A mature tree can grow 40-50 feet tall and have a spread of 18-40 feet at maturity! So the holly in the photo above is still a baby!

Here are some other facts about holly trees:

  • it is considered both an evergreen and an ornamental tree. I have been known to cut branches near Christmas and bring them in the house to decorate. They can be a pain to dear with, but well worth it!
  • grows well in acidic, loamy, moist, rich, sandy, well-drained and clay soils. While it prefers normal moisture, the tree has some flood tolerance and drought resistance.
  • The foliage of the American holly provides cover for songbirds and mammals, and after frost settles in, the fruit becomes a choice food for grouse, quail, wild turkeys and other songbirds. The flowers are also attractive to bees.
  • The American holly tree has been popular since the beginning of American history, having served the Native Americans with wood for many different applications and berries that were used for buttons and barter. It was said to be a favorite of George Washington, and more than a dozen hollies he planted are still evident today. It is also widely known as the basic raw material for Christmas wreaths. The first scientific observation of the American Holly tree was recorded in 1744.
  • https://www.arborday.org/trees/treeguid/TreeDetail.cfm?itemID=1071

Folklore:

  • The Holly tree is one of the most beloved, respected trees in Celtic mythology and is the evergreen twin of the Oak. It is said, that while the Oak was the controller of the light half of the year, the Holly tree controlled the dark, winter months.
  • Traditionally, the Holly tree is highly sacred in Celtic mythology and symbolizes peace and goodwill. Due to its resistance to lightning, it is associated with the Celtic and Norse gods of thunder, Taranis and Thor, and so was planted near dwellings to protect people from lightning strikes.
  • Druids believed the Holly tree to possess protective qualities, such as guarding against evil spirits and bad luck. Legend has it that bringing the leaves inside during the winter months would provide shelter from the cold for fairies, who in return would be kind to those who lived in the dwelling

THE HOLLY AND THE IVY LYRICS

The holly and the ivy,
When they are both full grown,
Of all trees that are in the wood,
The holly bears the crown:O, the rising of the sun,
And the running of the deer
The playing of the merry organ,
Sweet singing in the choir.The holly bears a blossom,
As white as lily flow’r,
And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ,
To be our dear Saviour:O, the rising of the sun,
And the running of the deer
The playing of the merry organ,
Sweet singing in the choir.The holly bears a berry,
As red as any blood,
And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ,
To do poor sinners good:O, the rising of the sun,
And the running of the deer
The playing of the merry organ,
Sweet singing in the choir.The holly bears a prickle,
As sharp as any thorn,
And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ,
On Christmas Day in the morn:O, the rising of the sun,
And the running of the deer
The playing of the merry organ,
Sweet singing in the choir.The holly bears a bark,
As bitter as any gall,
And Mary bore sweet Jesus Christ,
For to redeem us all:O, the rising of the sun,
And the running of the deer
The playing of the merry organ,
Sweet singing in-
Sweet singing in-
In the choir.

Hope you have a great day!

Thanks for stopping by!!

click on either image to see what I have available at Picfair and Pinterest

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